Getting the most from your drill

I have mentioned elsewhere that a reversable cordless drill is the most useful tool you can have for working on a mobile home.

Corded drills are cheaper and have more torque (twisting power) but the cord can be a pain if you are climbing a ladder or crawling under the home.

Obviously, drills can be used for drilling holes. There isn’t actually a lot of value in that for mobile home renovation and repair.
For mobile homes the value is in the ease of tightening and replacing the thousands of screws that hold the siding and other parts in place.
For mobile home repair you need two bits; 1/4″ and 5/16″ The bits should be magnetized so they hold the screw no matter how you have to reach. In the picture above you see an original, rusted screw with a 1/4″ head. These screws rust and come loose over time. I like to replace them with a 5/16″ screw so they hold better. I usually go a little longer but with care. You don’t want the new screw poking through a wall or hitting an electrical wire in the wall.

Some older homes have a few screws with a square opening.
I mostly found these holding up mirrors in the bathroom. Sometimes you can get them out with a regular Phillips head bit, but they actually make bits with a square head. The picture above shows a No. 2 square head bit tip.

You can get a lot of work done, save a lot of time, and spare yourself from tennis elbow with a good drill and the right bits.Corded drills are cheaper and have more torque (twisting power) but the cord can be a pain if you are climbing a ladder or crawling under the home.

Obviously, drills can be used for drilling holes. There isn’t actually a lot of value in that for mobile home renovation and repair.

For mobile homes the value is in the ease of tightening and replacing the thousands of screws that hold the siding and other parts in place.

For mobile home repair you need two bits; 1/4″ and 5/16″ The bits should be magnetized so they hold the screw no matter how you have to reach. In the picture above you see an original, rusted screw with a 1/4″ head. These screws rust and come loose over time. I like to replace them with a 5/16″ screw so they hold better. I usually go a little longer but with care. You don’t want the new screw poking through a wall or hitting an electrical wire in the wall.

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